Summer Vacation Time Management Worksheet

I’m not one of those moms who look forward to spending a long, lazy summer vacation at home with the kids. I’m one of those moms who wish the kids could stay in school all summer long.

I love my kids, but I don’t love having them all around the house, all day, every day, all summer. So I make schedules for them. They’re not too rigorous or inflexible, but it helps prevent too much milling around the house in boredom. It also alleviates some of the zombie-eyed screen infatuation, by making them do things outdoors and away from electronics.

Here is a worksheet I put together this morning. The kids resist having all of their time managed by Mom, because it feels too much like school and not enough like vacation. I’m hoping that this system will be a good compromise, allowing them to have some control over their time, while still fitting in the things I feel are essential, such as personal hygiene, nutrition, brain exercise, and outdoor fun.

It’s free to download and print, and you can also customize it for your own family. If you find it helpful, please leave a comment and/or share a link to this post with your friends. Happy vacationing!

Kids’ summer time management worksheet
summer-worksheet

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Classcraft Engages Students in Learning Game

Classcraft warriors

Classcraft warriors

I love games, and so do my kids. I often wonder how to incorporate game elements into everyday activities, to make life more fun and nerdy. I have just learned about a new game that teachers can play in class with students, and I think this is a very exciting innovation!

It’s called Classcraft, and it’s a live-action role playing game that involves students, teachers, individual responsibility and team work. Watch this video for an introduction to the Classcraft concept.

Classcraft is a role playing game that integrates into any subject class. With the teacher acting as Game Master, students are grouped into small teams and assume the character attributes of a Warrior, Mage, or Healer. Each character class has its own benefits, and the blend of roles encourages teams to work together and help each other. Of course, individual responsibility and achievements are most important to a student’s success in the game.

Classcraft healers

Classcraft healers

Game elements such as earning experience points, leveling-up, responding to random events, taking damage, and even in-game death bring the experience to life. Students earn points for doing classwork, helping each other and having a positive attitude, and lose points for being late, arguing, and poor performance. Scores translate into real-life benefits and consequences, such as in-class snacks or Saturday detention.

Classcraft is free to play, and can be upgraded for an additional cost per class or per school. The game is managed via a website, with teacher/student iOS apps, additional customizations, and other upgrades coming soon.

This is an interesting way to get students more engaged in classroom learning. Teachers can modify game elements to suit their needs, and not every student needs to participate, although I imagine most kids would want to get involved.

I’ve sent a link to Classcraft to the head of our charter school, and I hope you’ll share it, too. I’m supportive of anything that helps kids feel more excited about learning!

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