MacroBars are better than kale!

Earlier this summer, I was talked into buying and trying a raspberry-chocolate kale bar from the local grocery store’s “natural” section. It was NOT delicious. I’d sum up the flavor and texture as dirty grass. After that experience, I was somewhat less excited about trying a new nutrition bar, but I took a chance on MacroBars, and here is my report.

I received a box full of mini MacroBars, and at first, I thought there was no way I’d ever eat that many bars — I was expecting them to be yucky. However, I was pleasantly surprised. Like all of the MacroBars, the minis are USDA organic, non-GMO project verified, kosher, gluten free and vegan certified. AND, they taste delicious!

Macrobars

MacroBars

My favorite flavor was the peanut butter and chocolate (surprise, surprise), but I honestly thought all of the bars were tasty. They had a nice chewy texture, weren’t too grainy, and there wasn’t a grassy or dirt-flavored bite among them.

The minis were perfect mid-morning office snacks for me. They provided a nice bit of sweetness, and the nutty ones even gave me enough protein to help keep me from feeling hungry before lunch.

Macrobars

MacroBars

I had planned to take a few more photos of the bars, but I ate them. 🙂

GoMacro is available online, and if you use coupon code BLOGGER, you will get 40% off your first order. If you’re looking for a nutritious snack to take to work or to send to school with the kids this fall, take a look at MacroBars. I recommend them!

About GoMacro

About GoMacro

Check out the links below to learn more about the family-owned company and their full line of products.

Shop: https://gomacro.com/shop/ (remember to use code BLOGGER for a discount!)
Twitter: https://twitter.com/gomacro/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/gomacro
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/gomacro/
Instagram: https://instagram.com/gomacro/

Many thanks to GoMacro for providing me the samples!

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I Hate Auto-Flushing Toilets

I don’t think I’d ever used a public toilet at Wal-Mart until today. Generally, I avoid using public restrooms anywhere, but sometimes, you just have to go.

So, I parked my cart and went into the ladies’ room at my local Wal-Mart. Imagine my surprise when I discovered the new bidet! I’ve never used a bidet before, but I’ve heard they are something that rich people sometimes have installed in their home bathrooms. They are toilets that spray water on your butt, for an extra-clean bottom, right?

You’re probably thinking Wal-Mart is an unlikely place for a bidet toilet. So was I!

Guess what — it wasn’t a bidet! It was just a stupid toilet with an auto-flush feature.

auto flush toilet

Beware of the auto-flush!

I suppose auto-flush toilets are meant to keep people’s hands clean, by eliminating the need to press a flush lever manually. I presume the intended function of the auto-flush toilet would be something like this:

1. When the sensor indicates a person is seated, the toilet would not flush.
2. When the sensor detects the person has vacated the seat, it executes the hands-free flush.

However, that is not what happened to me today.

First of all, I don’t like to sit down on unfamliar toilets. The paper toilet seat cover dispenser was empty, so I fashioned my own by layering strips of toilet paper over the seat, and assumed the oh-so-graceful hover-squat. Most women who share my fear of foreign toilets are familiar with this position. Done improperly, it can result in a seat-sprinkling spray, so it requires mental concentration, a keen sense of balance, and strong thigh muscles.

What you DON’T want to happen when you’re trying to hover-squat over a dirty Wal-Mart toilet? AUTO-FLUSH.

So there I was, mid-squat, when the toilet started to rumble. Then, the water beneath me started to swirl. Uh-oh.

As the vortex of the rogue flush reached full pressure and velocity, I could feel my backside being sprayed and showered with cold, wet droplets, and a disgusting mist from the bowl. Toilet water and the leftover microscopic nasty bits of who knows how many strangers’ deposits, now clinging to my bare skin. Oh. My.

What would you have done? Of course, I started to stand up and wipe myself off. But you know what happens when you stand up from an auto-flushing toilet? It FLUSHES AGAIN.

Seriously?!

So I decided it might be safer to sit down again, because that’s how you’re supposed to tell the toilet that it shouldn’t flush yet, right? So I dried off the seat, which had also been fairly thoroughly spritzed by the flushing, laid down another layer of clean paper, and tried sitting down.

Too late! During the seat-preparation phase of my toilet transaction, the toilet must have thought I was seated, and when I turned around to actually sit, it went into geyser mode again.

Fountain Geyser in Yellowstone National Park

Fountain Geyser in Yellowstone National Park (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dammit! By that time, I was so frustrated and disgusted, I gave up.

I dried myself off, pulled up my pants, and went out to wash up. As soon as I got home, I threw all of my clothes into the laundry and took a shower. I hope I don’t catch death from the triple toilet unintended bidet-spray. Be careful out there, people!

Tips to Help Teens Find Jobs

The book is “A Teen’s Guide to Career Success: How to Get and Keep a Job”

Book cover

Book cover

My oldest kid is a 16 year old boy, who has recently decided he needs to get a job. When I was offered a chance to review “A Teen’s Guide to Career Success: How to Get and Keep a Job,” by Jim Comiskey, I thought the timing was perfect!

What’s inside?

The book follows two teenage reporters on assignment for their school paper to find out how to get and keep a job. As they interview three past graduates who have successful careers and businesses, they learn about each step of the job search process.

Along the way, the book has several worksheets for the reader to complete, which are designed to provide a self-evaluation of job-hunting and work readiness. The sections of the book address several stages of work/career, from preparing a resume and interviewing, to starting and keeping a job. It also addresses good employee attributes, such as having a positive attitude, working hard, cooperation, and time management.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

The verdict

My son thought the information in the book was definitely valuable, but found the story of the interviews to be kind of cheesey and lame. He said, “I don’t want to offend anyone, but the dialogue seems kind of childish.”

Example of graphic from book

Example of graphic from book

I thought the information was useful — not only for first-time job seekers — but for anybody trying to improve a job situation, or for people changing fields or re-entering the job market. Although seasoned employees will probably not learn anything new from this book, it will be a valuable resource for teens! As a parent, I’m happy to provide my teenager another resource that reinforces the things I’ve been trying to tell him about having a positive attitude and being willing to work hard.

The bottom line

I recommend “A Teen’s Guide to Career Success: How to Get and Keep a Job” for any teens who are starting to look for work. It contains practical information that will help kids get started on the right foot, whether they are looking for summer jobs or considering long-term career possibilities.

PS

Thanks to Blue Point Books for providing me with a review copy of this book!

Stop calling things “Artisan”

On a recent trip through the McDonald’s drive-thru, I was in the mood for a cheeseburger, but convinced myself to go with a slightly less guilt-inducing “Artisan Grilled Chicken Sandwich.”

On my way through Window One, the polite girl at the register confirmed my order, made change for the ten, and waved me forward to Window Two. The boy there handed me my Diet Coke and then said, “I’ll go get your Artesian.”

Artisan vs artesian

Stop calling things “artisan!”


Seriously?

This prompted a couple of thoughts for me:
1. Stop calling things “artisan.”
2. “Artesian” and “artisan” are NOT the same.

Dictionary.com provides this definition of “artisan.”
Artisan: Adjective. Pertaining to an artisan or the product of an artisan; artisanal: artisan beer.

I enjoyed my chicken sandwich. It was pretty good! But I doubt anything about it was “artisan.” The bun didn’t appear handmade. I doubt the chicken was an artisan. The people who assembled it in the kitchen? The kid who handed it through Window Two? Nope.

And while we’re talking about that kid, he’s not the first person I’ve heard say “artesian” when he meant “artisan.” In case you’re wondering, here’s what that means.

Artesian: Adjective. Noting, pertaining to, or characteristic of an artesian well.

And if you don’t remember what an artesian well is?

Artesian well: Noun. A well in which water rises under pressure from a permeable stratum overlaid by impermeable rock.

My sandwich was tasty, but it was neither artisan nor artesian.

Stop calling things “artisan!” And if you call anything “artesian” that is not well-related, you sound stupid.